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v. [with obj.] set (something) on fire

Alan’s father got a Kindle for his mother, and Alan handed it to me when she was done playing with it. We were at her parents’ – Alan’s grandparents’ – so there was no internet, which limited what you could do besides read the dictionary that comes loaded on there, and marvel at the non-backlit screen. After I’d looked at it covetously for a little while, Alan asked if I would maybe like one for my birthday or something, and then when I allowed as how that would be awesome, he handed me mine all gift-wrapped.

Christmas is awesome.

Anyway, we got into a small discussion about where to find good free books, and so I offer this list of free Kindle and/or any-device novels and short stories (only some of which I’ve already read, and many of which I found at Free Speculative Fiction Online or Project Gutenberg):

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7 Comments

  1. anne wrote:

    Mmm, Kindle. They are very cool. I’ve been contemplating getting one but the library doesn’t have e-loaning that’s compatible with the Kindle right now.

    Tuesday, December 28, 2010 at 3:07 pm | Permalink
  2. Yeah, the Nashville Public Library is pretty cool that way, IIRC. I haven’t actually tried them out yet.

    Wednesday, December 29, 2010 at 3:39 pm | Permalink
  3. Mum wrote:

    Two things worry me re E-books / Kindle
    1 That books may become scarce, expensive, redundant or otherwise difficult for me (’cause it’s all about me)to access at some future point.
    2 that using an E-reader too much will like using the monitor too much be a trigger for migraines. Which is the reason for concern #1. (too much being a changing and arbitrary amount of time to be determined by my-body-when- it-hates-me)
    Congrats on your Kindle. What a cool gift! Clever Alan. Merry Happy Joy Joy.
    Love, Mum

    Thursday, December 30, 2010 at 2:17 pm | Permalink
  4. Mum wrote:

    Two things worry me re E-books / Kindle
    1 That books may become scarce, expensive, redundant or otherwise difficult for me (’cause it’s all about me) to access at some future point.
    2 that using an E-reader too much will like using the monitor too much be a trigger for migraines. Which is the reason for concern #1. (too much being a changing and arbitrary amount of time to be determined by my-body-when- it-hates-me)
    Congrats on your Kindle. What a cool gift! Clever Alan. Merry Happy Joy Joy.
    Love, Mum

    Thursday, December 30, 2010 at 2:18 pm | Permalink
  5. I don’t think it will be a trigger for migraines. The screen isn’t lit at all. It’s matte, and the text displays using some sort of ink-based technology, so it’s like looking at a printed page. Now that’s just the Kindle, I don’t know what the Nook or the other ereaders work like since I’ve only seen photos online.

    Books will probably become more scarce but I think this is going to move slowly. Ebooks are only 10% of sales right now, and ereaders have been around for what, a decade or so? I predict that they’ll take awhile to reach full saturation of the market, and I think there will always be a market for books as art objects, like the sorts of things some letterpress publishers put out. Our friends Gaspereau are an example of where I think print books are headed.

    Thursday, December 30, 2010 at 9:30 pm | Permalink
  6. anne wrote:

    It will be a while before books become too scarce. E-book readers are still a “toy” for the priviledged. There’s still a large part of our population that can’t afford fancy things like a Kindle and that only have a very basic (if any) knowledge of how to use computers. If you don’t believe me, go to your public library and ask the reference librarian how many times they’ve had to teach someone how to do something really basic on the computer this week.

    I figure that as long as people are still buying paper newspapers, we’re still going to have paper books.

    Friday, December 31, 2010 at 10:11 am | Permalink
  7. I actually don’t think the price of ereaders is what’s going to slow things down that much. People who can’t afford the $140 for the Kindle (or whatever model they get) probably already don’t spend a lot on books, so they aren’t the people publishers are selling to. I think it’s the learning curve of being accustomed to computers – you are definitely right about that.

    I really don’t think physical books will ever go away (I do think print newspapers will though). I predict that 10 years from now, half of all books sold will be ebooks, and libraries will also loan ereaders to their patrons. I predict that by 30 years from now, most printed books will be art objects, or special leatherbound collector’s items, or coffeetable photography books.

    Friday, December 31, 2010 at 2:27 pm | Permalink